Monday, October 1, 2007

Injera


Did someone say, injera?

It worked...I'm sorta dumbfounded, but it really did. Sorry for the flash blowout, it's evening time here, I plan to post more shots tomorrow with some wot on top.

It's much darker and intensely flavored than the injera I'm used to. I think most restaurants cut the flour 1/2 teff half wheat, and that's what I'm gonna try next. Also, it's very sour. I think two days instead of three will do the trick.

For the record, so I have an easy place to find it:
  • Day 1. 1/2 cup atta flour mixed with 1/2 cup warm water.
  • Day 2. 1/2 cup unbleached white flour mixed with 1/2 cup warm water. Day 1. contents added to mixture and moved into a bigger jar (Day 1 contents had a bit of liquid on top and a nice slight sour smell).
  • Day 3. Half of the starter is discarded. Another 1/2 cup atta flour is mixed with 1/2 cup warm water and fed to the bubbly mix.
  • Day 4. Half of the starter is discarded. Another 1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour is mixed with 1/2 cup warm water and fed to the mix.
  • Day 5. Half of the starter is discarded. Another 1/2 cup cheap, enriched white flour is mixed with 1/2 cup warm water and fed to the mix.
  • Day 6. Same as Day 5. No bubbles. I'm starting over tomorrow...
  • Day 7. It was frothy this morning, I repeated Day 5, discarding half the starter and adding 1/2 cup white flour and a scant 1/2 cup of warm water. Hoozah!
  • Day 8. Repeat, repeat repeat.
  • Day 9. I sifted three cups of teff flour with 1 teaspoon of ground fenugreek seeds (ground in a coffee mill). Then I mixed the sifted mixture with 1/4 cup of the ersho (sourdough starter) and 1 cup of warm water to make a fairly stif dough. I knead the dough for about two minutes and then added 3 cups of warm water. With an immersion blender, I mixed the water and teff dough ball together to get a batter the consistency of a thin banana smoothie.
  • I let the mixture sit for two full days and on the third day, I made the injera. I used a brand new teflon pan and rubbed salt on top first. Then over medium heat I poured batter in a circle and tilted the pan to make it thick. I covered it until the edges just began to peel up and then took it off the skillet with a wooden spatula and laid it out on a towel to cool.

xo
kittee

11 comments:

  1. amazing! I can't wait to try it!

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  2. thank god this bread has someone as patient as you to make it. i'd have pulled up shop and moved to the levant to get myself some pita if i lived in ethiopia. bravo to you!
    salud! lechaim! mabrook! cheers! congrats! wahoooooooooooooo!
    kittee made injera!!!!!!!!!

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  3. looks good, congratulations.
    k

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  4. WOW! There's no stopping you. You are an amazingly patient and crafty lady! And so awesome to tweak and tweak and tweak till you get it right and then share with the masses :)

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  5. Seriously. Congrats on your triumph! You rule!

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  6. YAY! The birth of injera- truly a miraculous event. I'm getting a little teary-eyed here.

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  7. This sounds like a Friendship Cake I made with using slow starter. What does injera mean? Is it some kind of traditional cake? Nice to discover your blog.

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  8. Thanks everyone! I'm still really pleased about the results.

    Arfi, injera is a spongy sourdough flatbread that is made from teff flour and eaten as a staple with stew in Ethiopia.

    xo
    kittee

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  9. Hey...what is Atta flour? Also, AWESOME!

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  10. hi carol,
    atta flour is a whole wheat, high gluten flour that is very highly milled and is used to make indian flatbreads like chapati, roti and puri. you can find it easily in indian grocery stores.

    xo
    kittee

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